59814a16 a7d1 4ddc aaea ff439242df8c
Coat of arms
F181181a 6acf 46c8 b0ac efed92b2a7b7
Shirt
Bd019daf e054 484a ac9d 5a1f4deb7bb0

Starting lineup - published: 07.07.18

Position First name Last name Birthplace Like Dislike
GK Igor AKINFEEV Vidnoye

7

image/svg+xml

1

GK Stanislav KRITSYUK Tollyatti

0

image/svg+xml

0

GK Yuri LODIGIN Vladimir

0

image/svg+xml

0

DC Sergej IGNASHEVIC Moscow

0

image/svg+xml

0

DC Vasili BEREZUTSKI Moscow

5

image/svg+xml

1

DC/DRL Andrey SEMENOV Moscow

3

image/svg+xml

2

DC/DRL Ivan NOVOSELTSEV Moscow

0

image/svg+xml

1

DLC Yaroslav RAKITSKY Pershotravensk

0

image/svg+xml

0

DRL/DMC Roman SHISHKIN Voronezh

0

image/svg+xml

0

DR Vyacheslav KARAVAEV Moscow

1

image/svg+xml

1

DLC/ML Georgi JIKIA Moscow

1

image/svg+xml

1

DL/ML Emir NABIULLIN Kazan

0

image/svg+xml

0

DMC Denys GARMASH Milove

0

image/svg+xml

0

DMC Roman EMELJANOV Pavlovo

0

image/svg+xml

1

MC Artur YUSUPOV Samara

0

image/svg+xml

0

MC Denis GLUSHAKOV Millerovo

0

image/svg+xml

0

MC Pavel MAMAEEV Moscow

2

image/svg+xml

1

MC Ruslan ROTAN Poltava

0

image/svg+xml

0

MRC Aleksandr SAMEDOV Moscow

3

image/svg+xml

1

ML/DL Dmitri KOMBAROV Moscow

1

image/svg+xml

1

ML/DL Yuri ZHIRKOV Tambov

0

image/svg+xml

0

MRLC Oleg SHATOV Nizhny Tagil

0

image/svg+xml

0

AMC Oleg IVANOV Moscow

2

image/svg+xml

1

MRL/DR Oleg GUSEV Sumy

4

image/svg+xml

1

AMRL Denis CHERYSHEV Nizhny Novgorod

6

image/svg+xml

1

AMRL Vladislav IGNATJEV Naberezhnye Chelny 

0

image/svg+xml

0

FRLC Fyodor SMOLOV Saratov

0

image/svg+xml

0

FC Aleksandr BUKHAROV Naberezhnye Chelny

0

image/svg+xml

0

FC Fedor CHALOV Moscow

1

image/svg+xml

1

FC Vladimir GLADKYI Lozova

0

image/svg+xml

0

FC/SS Aleksandr KOKORIN Valuyki

0

image/svg+xml

0

FC/SS Artyom DZYUBA Moscow

5

image/svg+xml

1

(Today part of: western Russia, eastern Ukraine)

Ivan IV the Terrible (ruled 1533 – 1584) proclaimed himself Emperor of Russia (1547), and introduced the ZemskySobor (a parliament consisting of landowners), which reduced the power of boljars and the Church. In a series of attacks aimed to centralize the state, the Emperor took Kazan and Astrahan from the Tatars, expanded his borders towards the areas of lower Volga and Don rivers controlled by the Cossacks, and continued to expand towards Siberia. At the same time, in mid-16th century, the expansionist aspirations of Moscow turned towards the Baltics because Russians did not possess ports, and their trade depended on the intermediation of the Hanseatic League. In general, Russian trade with Western and Southern Europe occurred mostly through the northern route, along rivers, towards the Baltics, as the shores of the Black Sea remained in enemy hands from the beginning of the 13th century until the end of the 18th century. 

 Ivan entered Estonia, crushed the resistance of the Livonian Order, and took Narva (1568), which represented one of the biggest and most decisive shifts in the history of the Baltics that finally gave Russia an important corridor towards the West. The consequences of those conquests were represented in the future conflicts between Russia and their new powerful enemies, the Polish-Lithuanian Union and Sweden, who wanted to cut off all trade towards Narva, and redirect it towards ports under their control. As early as the beginning of the 17th century started to Moscow suffer their raids. In internal politics, the Emperor systematically crushed the resistance of independent nobility and, executing them by their thousands, confiscated their lands, and divided them between his followers –the oprichniks– noblemen in service, who held lands as “prebend” (payment) for life.

Sources
    • Fernard BRAUDEL, Civilizacije kroz povijest, Zagreb, 1990.
    • Felipe FERNANDEZ-ARMESTO, Narodi Europe, Zagreb, 1997.
    • Grupa autora, Povijest: Humanizam i renesansa, doba otkrića, knjiga VIII., Zagreb 2008.
    • Grupa autora, Povijest: Doba apsolutizma (17. stoljeće), knjiga X., Zagreb 2008.