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Starting lineup - published: 03.05.19

Position First name Last name Birthplace Like Dislike
GK Lukasz FABIANSKI Poznan

3

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1

GK Manuel NEUER Gelsenkirchen

10

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4

GK Marc Andre TER STEGEN Mönchengladbach

7

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0

DC Mats HUMMELS Bergisch Gladbach

8

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1

DC Niklas SÜLE Frankfurt am Main

6

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3

DRC Antonio RUDIGER Berlin

1

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1

DRC Jerome BOATENG Berlin

1

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1

DRC Shkodran MUSTAFI Bad Hersfeld

12

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1

DR Cedric SOARES Singen

4

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1

DL Jonas HECTOR Saarbrücken

2

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0

DL/DMC Sead KOLAŠINAC Karlsruhe

12

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0

DMC Grzegorz KRYCHOWIAK Gryfice

5

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1

DMC Piotr ZIELINSKI Ząbkowice Śląskie

7

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0

DMC/DRLC Emre CAN Frankfurt am Main

9

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1

DMC/DR Joshua KIMMICH Rottweil

6

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1

MC Julian WEIGL Bad Aibling

9

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0

MC Leon GÖRETZKA Bochum

6

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0

MC Sami KHEDIRA Stuttgart

9

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1

MC Toni KROOS Greifswald

2

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0

AMC Hakan CALHANOGLU Mannheim

7

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4

AMRLC Julian DRAXLER Gladbeck

9

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1

AMRLC Leroy SANE Essen

6

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1

AMRLC Mesut ÖZIL Gelsenkirchen

7

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1

AMRL Marco REUS Dortmund

16

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0

SS/FC Lukas PODOLSKI Gliwice

9

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1

SS/FC Thomas MÜLLER Weilheim in Oberbayern

10

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3

FC Krzysztof PIATEK Dzierżoniów

2

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0

FC Maximilian PHILLIPP Berlin

0

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2

FC Timo WERNER Stuttgart

7

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0

Germany was greatly harmed by the peace treaty in Versailles. It lost 1/7 of an economically important territory, numerous Germans became minorities in newly created neighboring countries, its transoceanic colonies were taken, and its army was reduced while its navy was taken. Furthermore French and Belgian troops soon after occupied Ruhr, the heart of Germany’s mining, industry and trade, in order to ensure that war reparations were paid in kind such as coal.

During this entire period, the socio-political situation was mostly unstable. Hard life was exacerbated by huge war reparation imposed by the Paris peace treaties after the war and Allied bankers who then “found solutions” for payments (in the form of short-term loans) that led to even greater debt. Inflation deprived the middle class of all savings and made industrial magnates absolute dictators of Germany’s economic life. The Germans themselves did not feel defeated in the war (after all, Germany was not conquered) and felt even less like they earned this defeat. Persistent opponents of the Weimar Republic convinced themselves that republicans, having removed the Kaiser and surrendered to the Entente, were responsible for the defeat of Germany and the difficult peace treaty.

The conditions in Germany were made worse with the start of the Great Depression in 1929. There was danger of a social revolution of the working class and streets became literally unsafe due to conflicts between paramilitary groups. Masses of disappointed, disoriented and disgruntled citizens had no idea who to be loyal to. In these conditions, the Nazis rose, led by Adolf Hitler who would become chancellor in 1933. A year later, after the referendum where more than 90% voters voted for it, the functions of chancellor and president were unified – Hitler became Führer.

Sources