43f6f58e 54d5 4f94 b3d7 d4ce1051f93a
Coat of arms
B5f66f07 e532 4e95 9f87 8c53a8efcc58
Shirt
2aa66645 4b3e 4f48 9b96 3bce7377b4da

Starting lineup - published: 15.02.19

Position First name Last name Birthplace Like Dislike
GK Kevin TRAPP Merzig

0

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0

GK Manuel NEUER Gelsenkirchen

10

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4

DC Joel MATIP Bochum

1

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2

DC Kamil GLIK Jastrzębie Zdrój

9

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0

DC Mats HUMMELS Bergisch Gladbach

8

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1

DRC Antonio RUDIGER Berlin

1

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1

DRC Jerome BOATENG Berlin

1

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1

DRLC Benedikt HÖWEDES Haltern

4

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0

DR Benjamin HENRICHS Cologne

2

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1

DR Felix PASSLACK Bottrop

1

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0

DL Jonas HECTOR Saarbrücken

2

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0

DL/MLC Yannick GERHARDT Würselen

1

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1

DMC Christoph KRAMER Solingen

2

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1

DMC Grzegorz KRYCHOWIAK Gryfice

5

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1

DMC Piotr ZIELINSKI Ząbkowice Śląskie

7

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0

MC Ilkay GÜNDOGAN Gelsenkirchen

7

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0

MC Leon GÖRETZKA Bochum

6

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0

MC Toni KROOS Greifswald

2

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0

MRLC Gonzalo CASTRO Wuppertal 

0

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0

AMRLC Julian DRAXLER Gladbeck

9

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1

AMRLC Kevin KAMPL Solingen

2

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0

AMRLC Leroy SANE Essen

6

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1

AMRLC Max MEYER Oberhausen

0

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0

AMRLC Mesut ÖZIL Gelsenkirchen

7

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1

AMRL Amin YOUNES Düsseldorf

1

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1

AMRL Karim BELLARABI Berlin

0

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0

AMRL Marco REUS Dortmund

16

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0

AMRL/SS Gökhan TöRE Cologne

0

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0

SS/FC Lukas PODOLSKI Gliwice

9

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1

FRLC Arkadiusz MILIK Tychy

8

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0

FC Maximilian PHILLIPP Berlin

0

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2

(Today: parts of eastern, northern and western Germany, parts of Silesia in Poland)

The members of the Confederation were more or less independent and their number was significantly lower when compared to the period of the Holy Roman Empire. It was a country focused on defense and economy, with a Federal Assembly in Frankfurt, presided by Austria. Common fear of French ideas held Austria and Prussia together in the next following decades. Prussia’s contribution in Napoleon’s defeat was rewarded at the Vienna Congress when it received parts of Saxony and Rhineland.

Prussian minister von Stein appealed to poets and writers to contribute to the creation of an image of a united nation after the banishment of the French, leading to German political nationalism. Still, the geographic form of this German nation was undefined: on the territory of the former Empire, only 25% spoke German, while Prussia itself was a kingdom in which at least six languages were spoken, aside from German. The regions where German was spoken were divided by political and dialectical differences, religion and a history of animosity dating back to the Thirty Years’ War. Since Prussia and Austria had parts of their territories that weren’t part of the German Confederation, the later attempts to create a national German country would be made even more difficult.   

Sources
    • Felipe FERNANDEZ-ARMESTO, Narodi Europe, Zagreb, 1997.
    • Patrick GEARY, Mit o nacijama – Srednjovjekovno poreklo Europe, Novi Sad, 2007.
    • Miran MARELJA, ''Međunarodni odnosi Prusije od Bečkog kongresa do ujedinjenja Njemačke (1815. - 1871.)'', Pravnik, 45/2012., br.91
    • Alan John Percivale TAYLOR, Habsburška monarhija: 1809-1918., Zagreb, 1990.
    • Grb https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coat_of_arms_of_Prussia