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Starting lineup - published: 19.05.18

Position First name Last name Birthplace Like Dislike
GK Asmir BEGOVIĆ Trebinje

8

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2

GK Ciprian TATARUSANU Bucharest

18

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7

GK Volkan BABACAN Antalya

5

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12

DC Dejan LOVREN Zenica

11

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0

DC Matija NASTASIĆ Valjevo

39

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1

DC Stefan SAVIĆ Mojkovac

32

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2

DRC Sokratis PAPASTATHOPOULOUS Kalamata

21

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3

DLC Stefan RADU Bucharest

17

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6

DRLC Nenad TOMOVIĆ Kragujevac

13

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4

DR Gokhan GONUL Bafra

1

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3

DR/MR Strahil POPOV Blagoewgrad

8

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7

DL/ML Konstantinos STAFYLIDIS Thessaloniki

7

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4

DL/MLC Caner ERKIN Balıkesir

6

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10

DC/DMC Caglar SÖYÜNCÜ Izmir

3

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10

DMC Luka MILIVOJEVIĆ Kragujevac

20

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6

DMC Nemanja MATIĆ Vrelo

40

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4

DMC Ozan TUFAN Bursa

4

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9

DMC Selcuk INAN İskenderun

8

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8

MC Miralem PJANIĆ Tuzla

10

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0

AMRLC Adem LJAJIĆ Novi Pazar

20

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2

AMRLC Arda TURAN Fatih

13

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2

AMRLC Kostas FORTOUNIS Trikala

18

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7

AMRL Filip KOSTIĆ Kragujevac

17

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3

AMRL Lazar MARKOVIĆ Čačak

13

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6

AMRL Xerdan SHAQIRI Gjilan

24

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13

SS/FC Stevan JOVETIĆ Podgorica

20

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2

FRLC Admir MEHMEDI Gostivar

3

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11

FRLC Enes ÜNAL Bursa

3

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6

FC Aleksandar MITROVIĆ Smederevo

18

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5

FC Burak YILMAZ Antalya

6

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8

FC Edin DŽEKO Sarajevo

13

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2

FC Ilija NESTOROVSKI Prilep

16

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3

FC Konstantinos MITROGLOU Kavala

7

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4

(Today part of Turkey, Greece, Bulgaria, Romania, central and south Serbia, Macedonia, Albania (without Skhoder), Montenegero, central and south Bosnia and Herzegovina)

At the beginning of the 14th century, in the province in an Asia Minorwhich was closest to Constantinople, the Muslim warlord Osman (Othman) created a state that will be named after him. After gaining the status and material privileges as “fighters against infidels,” his successors expanded the state borders in all directions. The members of the dynasty and the ruling Islamic classes called themselves Ottomans, while the term “Turk” was used in a negative context, with the connotations of being reserved for “peasantry,” “primitive,” etc. Europeans, on the other hand, knew the Ottomans as “Turks,” and after the 16th century, the word Turk became synonymous with the word Muslim. The full extent of the state’s power was concentrated in the person of the Sultan, whose word was law and could not be questioned. Despite decisions being made together with his councillors, he was the one who determined the course of the state’s policy. As the threat of incursions by the Mongol hordes from Central Asia disappeared at the beginning of the 15th century, the Ottomans turned to conquering Constantinople, the centre of the Byzantine Empire, which had already been reduced to a small territory, completely surrounded by Ottoman lands.

The fall of Constantinople (1453) fortified the position of the Ottoman Empire in Europe, and provided the initial push for a broader military campaign in the Balkans. Due to their defeat at Nagyvarad (Belgrade) in 1456, the Ottomans’ push into the Kingdom of Hungary was delayed for the next seventy years. Nevertheless, the Ottomans managed to include Serbia into their state (1459), and some time later (1463), Bosnia, a vassal state of the Hungarian crown, after which they conquered the territory known as “Herceg Lands.” The rest of Mehmed II’s rule (ruled 1451 – 1481) saw the empire engaged in wars in Asia Minor and wars against Wallachian dukes. The Crimean Khanate was also added to the empire, and its powerful Tatar cavalry was integrated into the Ottoman armyfrom then on.The Ottoman Empire was a theocratic (Theos – God) state and the religious affiliation of an individual or a group was the only important factor on which their social status and the possibilities of moving upwards within the society depended, which probably represented one of the reasons why any other identity was hard to achieve.

 

Sources